Archive for December, 2006

Chocolate Math Puzzle Expires Soon!

A little while ago I sent out a puzzle submitted by Micaela called Chocolate Math. If you can explain how it works, I’ll give you some chocolate. (Open to the first 3 who can explain it). The puzzle and offer expire at the end of 2006. So hurry.

Advertisements

Comments (1)

Ecological Footprint Part III

This weekend I was inspired to create a website called Save the Planet: Ecological Footprint Education. One of the most valuable things we can do is to become stewards, or protectors, of the Earth. This website has resources, videos and suggestions on how to reduce your ecological footprint. If you know of any other great ideas on how to save the planet or other helpful resources, please share them with the class. (Click on the title of the email. It’ll take you to the blog where you can post comments for all of our benefit.)

We are currently in a very consumer-based culture, which is not living at a sustainable level. We need to question the value of this pattern, if we are to change it. Do you feel better when you make a purchase? Does it give you a deep sense of satisfaction or is it temporarily filling a void? Creating a shift in awareness and values will be important aspects of healing the planet. Are you willing to question your shopping impulses?

Comments (29)

Fractions & Percent-Decimals-Fractions Test

The fractions, percents-decimals-fractions & multiplying & dividing monomials test is day 4 of this week. Math Tutor: Fractions is a great resource to help you prepare. This website that I created has tutorials, videos and fun games to teach you about fractions and how to change from fractions, decimals to percents. I’d love to hear your comments about the site. Leave a post.

If you haven’t see the YouTube video on multiplying and dividing monomials, I recommend it highly. It will help you to avoid common mistakes.

Comments (2)

Ecological Footprint Part II

I just took the ecological footprint quiz. Have you taken it yet? Here are my quiz results.

 

CATEGORY ACRES
FOOD 2.2
MOBILITY 2
SHELTER 9.9
GOODS/SERVICES 8.2
TOTAL FOOTPRINT 22

IN COMPARISON, THE AVERAGE ECOLOGICAL FOOTPRINT IN YOUR COUNTRY IS 24 ACRES PER PERSON.WORLDWIDE, THERE EXIST 4.5 BIOLOGICALLY PRODUCTIVE ACRES PER PERSON.
IF EVERYONE LIVED LIKE YOU, WE WOULD NEED 5 PLANETS.

5 planets! Yikes! It can be a bit depressing to see the results of your quiz. Don’t despair. Take action! Look at the choices you make daily and your consumption. What can you do to decrease your ecological footprint? Post your comments for others to benefit from your wisdom and insight.

If you liked the ecological footprint quiz, you may also enjoy taking the Bobby Bigfoot Quiz. It shows how the daily choices that you make impact your ecological footprint.

Comments (7)

Multiplying & Dividing Monomials

A monomial is a single term. For example, 3x, -5xy and 7 are all monomials. When multiplying and dividing monomials, it’s a helpful to write the problem in expanded form. a^2*a^3 = a*a*a*a*a = a^5. (That looks weird. I’ll be happy when blogging supports math software!)

For a quick reteach of multiplying and dividing monomials, check out this video. It also discusses common pitfalls to avoid. [YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6T1BtXKZbs]

Comments (12)

Robotics: Thanks Kiddo & Mr. MacDonald

We got a grant from Kiddo to do robotics!

Toward the end of the year all 7th graders will be working in teams to build robots as part of a unit on ratios and speed, but you don’t have to wait until May to learn about robotics. Join the MVMS Robotics Team, which will meet Wednesdays and Fridays from 7:30-8:30 a.m. starting January 10th. If you’re interested, pick up an application from Mr. MacDonald or me. Applications are due December 20th. The team also needs people interested in grant writing, building a website and filming a documentary.

Maybe you’re interested but you aren’t a morning person… then check out these websites about robotics:
JPL-NASA Robotics
Tech Museum of Innovation
US First
Robotics Nasa
Lego MindStorm Robots (Check out the videos of robots in action!)

Thanks Kiddo and Mr. MacDonald!

Leave a Comment

Chocolate Math

This blog post was submitted by Micaela. Right as I opened her email a friend rang my doorbell and had an article about chocolate. How cool is that! I think I’ll go have a piece of chocolate while you figure this out.

YOUR AGE BY CHOCOLATE MATH

          This is pretty neat.

DON’T CHEAT BY SCROLLING DOWN FIRST!

 

 

It takes less than a minute.

Work this out as you read…

Be sure you don’t read the bottom until you’ve worked it out!

This is not one of those, waste of time things.

It’s fun.

1. First of all, pick the number of times a week that you would like to have chocolate (more than once but less than 10).

.

.

.

.

2. Multiply this by 2 (just to be bold) .

.

.

.

.

3. Add 5.

.

.

.

.

.

4. Multiply it by 50 — I’ll wait while you get your calculator. (See if you can do it mentally. It’s not that difficult if you think of 50 as half of 100).

.

.

.

.

.

.

5. If you have already had your birthday this year, add 1756 …

If you haven’t, add 1755.

.

.

.

.

.

6. Now subtract the four digit year that you were born.

.

.

You should have a three digit number.

The first digit of this year was your original number (i.e. how many times you want to have chocolate each week).

The second two numbers are YOUR AGE! (Oh YES, it is!!!!)

.

.

.

.

.

This is the only year (2006) it will ever work, so spread it around while it lasts.

Can you figure out why it works? We’d love to hear your comments.

Comments (10)