Archive for Puzzle

Benjamin Banneker Puzzle

Benjamin Banneker (1731-1806) was born to a former slave on a farm near Baltimore. He taught himself surveying, astronomy, and mathematics. He later published several almanacs containing his astronomical observations. Banneker surveyed the District of Columbia. Here is one of his puzzles for homework. Make a guess and check table or show your work in some fashion:

A gentleman sent his servant with £100 to buy 100 cattle, with orders to give £5 for each bullock, 20 shillings for cows, and one shilling for each sheep. The question is to know what number of each sort he bought for his master.

NOTES: 20 shillings = £1; bullock = young bull
Cattle = animals in the genus bovine, includes cows, bulls, sheep, goats, swine, horses.

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Teacher Website, Retakes & Candy Math

The MVMS website is down probably until Friday. If you need to access the homework  website, go to teacherweb.com. This link will take you directly to my home page.

Remember, retakes are Thursday at lunch or after school.

Did you try Candy Math? I think you’ll like it. Why does it work?

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Candy Math

Happy New Year!

 

If you liked Chocolate Math, then you’ll enjoy this puzzle that I created called Candy Math. Can you figure out why it works?

I’ll give you a hint, I am a math teacher and I love equations.

 

 

 

 

 

YOUR AGE BY CANDY MATH

This is pretty neat.

DON’T CHEAT BY SCROLLING DOWN FIRST!

 

 

It takes less than a minute.

Work this out as you read…

Be sure you don’t read the bottom until you’ve worked it out!

This is not one of those, waste of time things.

It’s fun.

1. First of all, pick the number of times a week that you would like to have candy (more than once but less than 10).

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2. Multiply this by 4 (just to be bold) .

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3. Add 9.

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4. Multiply it by 25 — I’ll wait while you get your calculator. (See if you can do it mentally. It’s not that difficult if you think of 25 as one fourth of 100).

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5. If you have already had your birthday this year, add 1782 …

If you haven’t, add 1781.

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6. Now subtract the four digit year that you were born.

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You should have a three digit number.

The first digit of this year was your original number (i.e. how many times you want to have candy each week).

The second two numbers are YOUR AGE! (Oh YES, it is!!!!)

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This is the only year (2007) it will ever work, so spread it around while it lasts.

Can you figure out why it works? We’d love to hear your comments.

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Chocolate Math Puzzle Expires Soon!

A little while ago I sent out a puzzle submitted by Micaela called Chocolate Math. If you can explain how it works, I’ll give you some chocolate. (Open to the first 3 who can explain it). The puzzle and offer expire at the end of 2006. So hurry.

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